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Grow Your Own Vegetable Garden From Leftover Scraps Slideshow

Grow Your Own Vegetable Garden From Leftover Scraps Slideshow



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Leeks, Scallions, or Green Onions

With leeks, scallions, or green onions, you can simply take the root end of the vegetable and place it in a jar with water, according to Itsafabulouslife.com. Once the roots begin to grow, you can replant into a container.

Greens

Greens — such as celery, bok choy, romaine, and cabbage — work similarly; just place the root end in a bowl of water. While it starts to sprout new leaves and roots grow, spritz the leaves with water to keep them damp. Then replant it in soil, leaving just the leaves showing above the ground.

Garlic

All you need to start growing garlic is one clove. Plant it root down and leave the container in a place with lots of direct sunlight. Once new shoots are established, cut them back so the plant will focus its energy on producing the garlic bulb.

Potatoes

Did your potatoes start sprouting "eyes"? Well, according to Wakeupworld.com, you can take 2-inch-sized pieces that have a couple of eyes and let them dry out. Then plant the pieces 8 inches deep with the eye facing up. You’ll want to add more soil as the roots appear. You can do the same thing with sweet potatoes!


How to Regrow Produce from Leftover Veggies

Looking for an eco-friendly project to do as a family? Put kids in charge of tracking the vegetables' progress as they grow, then try a few new recipes with your harvest!

Green onions

Remove the white bulbs of the green onions, keeping the roots intact. Stand them in a small jar with just enough water to submerge the roots (do not submerge the bulbs). Place your jar in a window sill, changing the water about once a week. Green shoots should sprout from the bulbs after a few days.

Sweet peppers and chilies

Don't throw out your pepper seeds! Plant them in potting soil in medium-sized containers and place them in a spot with lots of sunlight. Peppers and chilies do even better in hot weather, so they'll thrive as the summer goes on. Kids can be on the lookout for colors to change from green to purple, yellow, red, and orange.

Tomatoes

Pierce the bottom of a large plastic container with a few holes, then fill two-thirds with potting mix. Add a few halved cherry tomatoes, cut-sides up, then cover with a thin layer of potting mix. After about three weeks, transfer the stems to larger pots or your garden, watering every few days. Once they're ripe, kids can harvest the tomatoes for salads and snacks.

Radishes

Pierce a large radish on either side with toothpicks, then suspend root-side down in a tall glass of water so just the root end is submerged. Fine white hairs should start to grow down into the glass. Radishes will grow quickly once transferred to a container with potting soil—a great choice for kids who want to see big results fast.

Herbs

Trim all but the top leaves from thicker stems of basil and mint. Trim the stem ends, then submerge the ends in a few inches of water in a tall glass or water bottle. The herbs are ready to plant in containers when they sprout lots of fine roots. Basil and mint leaves are tender and mild so kids can enjoy plucking and eating them right off the plant.


How to Regrow Produce from Leftover Veggies

Looking for an eco-friendly project to do as a family? Put kids in charge of tracking the vegetables' progress as they grow, then try a few new recipes with your harvest!

Green onions

Remove the white bulbs of the green onions, keeping the roots intact. Stand them in a small jar with just enough water to submerge the roots (do not submerge the bulbs). Place your jar in a window sill, changing the water about once a week. Green shoots should sprout from the bulbs after a few days.

Sweet peppers and chilies

Don't throw out your pepper seeds! Plant them in potting soil in medium-sized containers and place them in a spot with lots of sunlight. Peppers and chilies do even better in hot weather, so they'll thrive as the summer goes on. Kids can be on the lookout for colors to change from green to purple, yellow, red, and orange.

Tomatoes

Pierce the bottom of a large plastic container with a few holes, then fill two-thirds with potting mix. Add a few halved cherry tomatoes, cut-sides up, then cover with a thin layer of potting mix. After about three weeks, transfer the stems to larger pots or your garden, watering every few days. Once they're ripe, kids can harvest the tomatoes for salads and snacks.

Radishes

Pierce a large radish on either side with toothpicks, then suspend root-side down in a tall glass of water so just the root end is submerged. Fine white hairs should start to grow down into the glass. Radishes will grow quickly once transferred to a container with potting soil—a great choice for kids who want to see big results fast.

Herbs

Trim all but the top leaves from thicker stems of basil and mint. Trim the stem ends, then submerge the ends in a few inches of water in a tall glass or water bottle. The herbs are ready to plant in containers when they sprout lots of fine roots. Basil and mint leaves are tender and mild so kids can enjoy plucking and eating them right off the plant.


How to Regrow Produce from Leftover Veggies

Looking for an eco-friendly project to do as a family? Put kids in charge of tracking the vegetables' progress as they grow, then try a few new recipes with your harvest!

Green onions

Remove the white bulbs of the green onions, keeping the roots intact. Stand them in a small jar with just enough water to submerge the roots (do not submerge the bulbs). Place your jar in a window sill, changing the water about once a week. Green shoots should sprout from the bulbs after a few days.

Sweet peppers and chilies

Don't throw out your pepper seeds! Plant them in potting soil in medium-sized containers and place them in a spot with lots of sunlight. Peppers and chilies do even better in hot weather, so they'll thrive as the summer goes on. Kids can be on the lookout for colors to change from green to purple, yellow, red, and orange.

Tomatoes

Pierce the bottom of a large plastic container with a few holes, then fill two-thirds with potting mix. Add a few halved cherry tomatoes, cut-sides up, then cover with a thin layer of potting mix. After about three weeks, transfer the stems to larger pots or your garden, watering every few days. Once they're ripe, kids can harvest the tomatoes for salads and snacks.

Radishes

Pierce a large radish on either side with toothpicks, then suspend root-side down in a tall glass of water so just the root end is submerged. Fine white hairs should start to grow down into the glass. Radishes will grow quickly once transferred to a container with potting soil—a great choice for kids who want to see big results fast.

Herbs

Trim all but the top leaves from thicker stems of basil and mint. Trim the stem ends, then submerge the ends in a few inches of water in a tall glass or water bottle. The herbs are ready to plant in containers when they sprout lots of fine roots. Basil and mint leaves are tender and mild so kids can enjoy plucking and eating them right off the plant.


How to Regrow Produce from Leftover Veggies

Looking for an eco-friendly project to do as a family? Put kids in charge of tracking the vegetables' progress as they grow, then try a few new recipes with your harvest!

Green onions

Remove the white bulbs of the green onions, keeping the roots intact. Stand them in a small jar with just enough water to submerge the roots (do not submerge the bulbs). Place your jar in a window sill, changing the water about once a week. Green shoots should sprout from the bulbs after a few days.

Sweet peppers and chilies

Don't throw out your pepper seeds! Plant them in potting soil in medium-sized containers and place them in a spot with lots of sunlight. Peppers and chilies do even better in hot weather, so they'll thrive as the summer goes on. Kids can be on the lookout for colors to change from green to purple, yellow, red, and orange.

Tomatoes

Pierce the bottom of a large plastic container with a few holes, then fill two-thirds with potting mix. Add a few halved cherry tomatoes, cut-sides up, then cover with a thin layer of potting mix. After about three weeks, transfer the stems to larger pots or your garden, watering every few days. Once they're ripe, kids can harvest the tomatoes for salads and snacks.

Radishes

Pierce a large radish on either side with toothpicks, then suspend root-side down in a tall glass of water so just the root end is submerged. Fine white hairs should start to grow down into the glass. Radishes will grow quickly once transferred to a container with potting soil—a great choice for kids who want to see big results fast.

Herbs

Trim all but the top leaves from thicker stems of basil and mint. Trim the stem ends, then submerge the ends in a few inches of water in a tall glass or water bottle. The herbs are ready to plant in containers when they sprout lots of fine roots. Basil and mint leaves are tender and mild so kids can enjoy plucking and eating them right off the plant.


How to Regrow Produce from Leftover Veggies

Looking for an eco-friendly project to do as a family? Put kids in charge of tracking the vegetables' progress as they grow, then try a few new recipes with your harvest!

Green onions

Remove the white bulbs of the green onions, keeping the roots intact. Stand them in a small jar with just enough water to submerge the roots (do not submerge the bulbs). Place your jar in a window sill, changing the water about once a week. Green shoots should sprout from the bulbs after a few days.

Sweet peppers and chilies

Don't throw out your pepper seeds! Plant them in potting soil in medium-sized containers and place them in a spot with lots of sunlight. Peppers and chilies do even better in hot weather, so they'll thrive as the summer goes on. Kids can be on the lookout for colors to change from green to purple, yellow, red, and orange.

Tomatoes

Pierce the bottom of a large plastic container with a few holes, then fill two-thirds with potting mix. Add a few halved cherry tomatoes, cut-sides up, then cover with a thin layer of potting mix. After about three weeks, transfer the stems to larger pots or your garden, watering every few days. Once they're ripe, kids can harvest the tomatoes for salads and snacks.

Radishes

Pierce a large radish on either side with toothpicks, then suspend root-side down in a tall glass of water so just the root end is submerged. Fine white hairs should start to grow down into the glass. Radishes will grow quickly once transferred to a container with potting soil—a great choice for kids who want to see big results fast.

Herbs

Trim all but the top leaves from thicker stems of basil and mint. Trim the stem ends, then submerge the ends in a few inches of water in a tall glass or water bottle. The herbs are ready to plant in containers when they sprout lots of fine roots. Basil and mint leaves are tender and mild so kids can enjoy plucking and eating them right off the plant.


How to Regrow Produce from Leftover Veggies

Looking for an eco-friendly project to do as a family? Put kids in charge of tracking the vegetables' progress as they grow, then try a few new recipes with your harvest!

Green onions

Remove the white bulbs of the green onions, keeping the roots intact. Stand them in a small jar with just enough water to submerge the roots (do not submerge the bulbs). Place your jar in a window sill, changing the water about once a week. Green shoots should sprout from the bulbs after a few days.

Sweet peppers and chilies

Don't throw out your pepper seeds! Plant them in potting soil in medium-sized containers and place them in a spot with lots of sunlight. Peppers and chilies do even better in hot weather, so they'll thrive as the summer goes on. Kids can be on the lookout for colors to change from green to purple, yellow, red, and orange.

Tomatoes

Pierce the bottom of a large plastic container with a few holes, then fill two-thirds with potting mix. Add a few halved cherry tomatoes, cut-sides up, then cover with a thin layer of potting mix. After about three weeks, transfer the stems to larger pots or your garden, watering every few days. Once they're ripe, kids can harvest the tomatoes for salads and snacks.

Radishes

Pierce a large radish on either side with toothpicks, then suspend root-side down in a tall glass of water so just the root end is submerged. Fine white hairs should start to grow down into the glass. Radishes will grow quickly once transferred to a container with potting soil—a great choice for kids who want to see big results fast.

Herbs

Trim all but the top leaves from thicker stems of basil and mint. Trim the stem ends, then submerge the ends in a few inches of water in a tall glass or water bottle. The herbs are ready to plant in containers when they sprout lots of fine roots. Basil and mint leaves are tender and mild so kids can enjoy plucking and eating them right off the plant.


How to Regrow Produce from Leftover Veggies

Looking for an eco-friendly project to do as a family? Put kids in charge of tracking the vegetables' progress as they grow, then try a few new recipes with your harvest!

Green onions

Remove the white bulbs of the green onions, keeping the roots intact. Stand them in a small jar with just enough water to submerge the roots (do not submerge the bulbs). Place your jar in a window sill, changing the water about once a week. Green shoots should sprout from the bulbs after a few days.

Sweet peppers and chilies

Don't throw out your pepper seeds! Plant them in potting soil in medium-sized containers and place them in a spot with lots of sunlight. Peppers and chilies do even better in hot weather, so they'll thrive as the summer goes on. Kids can be on the lookout for colors to change from green to purple, yellow, red, and orange.

Tomatoes

Pierce the bottom of a large plastic container with a few holes, then fill two-thirds with potting mix. Add a few halved cherry tomatoes, cut-sides up, then cover with a thin layer of potting mix. After about three weeks, transfer the stems to larger pots or your garden, watering every few days. Once they're ripe, kids can harvest the tomatoes for salads and snacks.

Radishes

Pierce a large radish on either side with toothpicks, then suspend root-side down in a tall glass of water so just the root end is submerged. Fine white hairs should start to grow down into the glass. Radishes will grow quickly once transferred to a container with potting soil—a great choice for kids who want to see big results fast.

Herbs

Trim all but the top leaves from thicker stems of basil and mint. Trim the stem ends, then submerge the ends in a few inches of water in a tall glass or water bottle. The herbs are ready to plant in containers when they sprout lots of fine roots. Basil and mint leaves are tender and mild so kids can enjoy plucking and eating them right off the plant.


How to Regrow Produce from Leftover Veggies

Looking for an eco-friendly project to do as a family? Put kids in charge of tracking the vegetables' progress as they grow, then try a few new recipes with your harvest!

Green onions

Remove the white bulbs of the green onions, keeping the roots intact. Stand them in a small jar with just enough water to submerge the roots (do not submerge the bulbs). Place your jar in a window sill, changing the water about once a week. Green shoots should sprout from the bulbs after a few days.

Sweet peppers and chilies

Don't throw out your pepper seeds! Plant them in potting soil in medium-sized containers and place them in a spot with lots of sunlight. Peppers and chilies do even better in hot weather, so they'll thrive as the summer goes on. Kids can be on the lookout for colors to change from green to purple, yellow, red, and orange.

Tomatoes

Pierce the bottom of a large plastic container with a few holes, then fill two-thirds with potting mix. Add a few halved cherry tomatoes, cut-sides up, then cover with a thin layer of potting mix. After about three weeks, transfer the stems to larger pots or your garden, watering every few days. Once they're ripe, kids can harvest the tomatoes for salads and snacks.

Radishes

Pierce a large radish on either side with toothpicks, then suspend root-side down in a tall glass of water so just the root end is submerged. Fine white hairs should start to grow down into the glass. Radishes will grow quickly once transferred to a container with potting soil—a great choice for kids who want to see big results fast.

Herbs

Trim all but the top leaves from thicker stems of basil and mint. Trim the stem ends, then submerge the ends in a few inches of water in a tall glass or water bottle. The herbs are ready to plant in containers when they sprout lots of fine roots. Basil and mint leaves are tender and mild so kids can enjoy plucking and eating them right off the plant.


How to Regrow Produce from Leftover Veggies

Looking for an eco-friendly project to do as a family? Put kids in charge of tracking the vegetables' progress as they grow, then try a few new recipes with your harvest!

Green onions

Remove the white bulbs of the green onions, keeping the roots intact. Stand them in a small jar with just enough water to submerge the roots (do not submerge the bulbs). Place your jar in a window sill, changing the water about once a week. Green shoots should sprout from the bulbs after a few days.

Sweet peppers and chilies

Don't throw out your pepper seeds! Plant them in potting soil in medium-sized containers and place them in a spot with lots of sunlight. Peppers and chilies do even better in hot weather, so they'll thrive as the summer goes on. Kids can be on the lookout for colors to change from green to purple, yellow, red, and orange.

Tomatoes

Pierce the bottom of a large plastic container with a few holes, then fill two-thirds with potting mix. Add a few halved cherry tomatoes, cut-sides up, then cover with a thin layer of potting mix. After about three weeks, transfer the stems to larger pots or your garden, watering every few days. Once they're ripe, kids can harvest the tomatoes for salads and snacks.

Radishes

Pierce a large radish on either side with toothpicks, then suspend root-side down in a tall glass of water so just the root end is submerged. Fine white hairs should start to grow down into the glass. Radishes will grow quickly once transferred to a container with potting soil—a great choice for kids who want to see big results fast.

Herbs

Trim all but the top leaves from thicker stems of basil and mint. Trim the stem ends, then submerge the ends in a few inches of water in a tall glass or water bottle. The herbs are ready to plant in containers when they sprout lots of fine roots. Basil and mint leaves are tender and mild so kids can enjoy plucking and eating them right off the plant.


How to Regrow Produce from Leftover Veggies

Looking for an eco-friendly project to do as a family? Put kids in charge of tracking the vegetables' progress as they grow, then try a few new recipes with your harvest!

Green onions

Remove the white bulbs of the green onions, keeping the roots intact. Stand them in a small jar with just enough water to submerge the roots (do not submerge the bulbs). Place your jar in a window sill, changing the water about once a week. Green shoots should sprout from the bulbs after a few days.

Sweet peppers and chilies

Don't throw out your pepper seeds! Plant them in potting soil in medium-sized containers and place them in a spot with lots of sunlight. Peppers and chilies do even better in hot weather, so they'll thrive as the summer goes on. Kids can be on the lookout for colors to change from green to purple, yellow, red, and orange.

Tomatoes

Pierce the bottom of a large plastic container with a few holes, then fill two-thirds with potting mix. Add a few halved cherry tomatoes, cut-sides up, then cover with a thin layer of potting mix. After about three weeks, transfer the stems to larger pots or your garden, watering every few days. Once they're ripe, kids can harvest the tomatoes for salads and snacks.

Radishes

Pierce a large radish on either side with toothpicks, then suspend root-side down in a tall glass of water so just the root end is submerged. Fine white hairs should start to grow down into the glass. Radishes will grow quickly once transferred to a container with potting soil—a great choice for kids who want to see big results fast.

Herbs

Trim all but the top leaves from thicker stems of basil and mint. Trim the stem ends, then submerge the ends in a few inches of water in a tall glass or water bottle. The herbs are ready to plant in containers when they sprout lots of fine roots. Basil and mint leaves are tender and mild so kids can enjoy plucking and eating them right off the plant.